I strongly encourage everyone to purchase a copy of Dalton Thomas' newest book, Unto Death: Martyrdom, Mission, and the Maturity of the Church. Dalton is dear brother, friend, and co-laborer for the Gospel. He is also the author of The Controversy of Zion and...

Joel Richardson WND

While some still refer to the revolution that swept through the Middle East as the “Arab Spring,” many others, particularly Muslims throughout the Middle East, refer to it more properly as the “Islamic Awakening.” As history will forever testify, President Barack Obama’s role in the unfolding of the Islamic Awakening was to support or assist in the overthrow of two leaders (so far), resulting in two new Islamist governments in Egypt and Libya. Allāhu Akbar!

Joel Richardson

The Book of Revelation, chapter 19, contains what is perhaps the most famous Biblical passage concerning the return of Jesus. There, Jesus the Messiah is seen to burst forth from heaven, riding on a white horse with the armies of heaven following Him. But as powerful and well known as this prophetic portrayal of the return of Jesus is, few are aware of the fact that the prophecy of Ezekiel 38 and 39, most often known as the Battle of Gog of Magog, also concludes with the return of Jesus. In fact, it can be said that Ezekiel 38 and 39 is in fact, the Armageddon of the Old Testament.

Joel Richardson WND

In several commentary articles featured on WND, I have been addressing the oracle of Ezekiel 38 and 39, and showing why we should understand it to parallel other Antichristic prophecies and passages. In other words, I have explained why Gog is the Antichrist/Beast and why Gog’s hordes are one and the same with the armies of the Antichrist. But while there are numerous very clear reasons to support this view, there remain several objections that seem to maintain traction among those who hold to the popular view that Gog and the Antichrist are two different individuals. In this article, I want to dismantle one of the most common of these arguments.

Joel Richardson WND

The prophecy of Ezekiel 38 and 39, often referred to as the Battle of Gog and Magog is hands-down, one of the most influential end-time prophecies in all of Scripture. But it is also arguably one of the most misinterpreted prophecies. In previous articles, I’ve explained that while many prophecy teachers claim that Ezekiel is speaking of a Russia-led invasion of Israel, the historical record and modern scholarship show that it is in fact a Turkish-led invasion. As previously discussed, the popular but faulty line of reasoning many follow to conclude a Russian-led invasion is as follows: 1. Magog and the Scythians are one and the same. 2. The Scythians lived in Russia. 3. Gog, the leader of Ezekiel’s invasion, comes from Magog. 4. Thus Ezekiel’s prophesied invasion is led by a leader from Russia.

Joel Richardson WND For years, students of Bible prophecy have been taught that “Gog,” spoken of in Ezekiel 38 and 39, cannot be the same as the Antichrist/Beast spoken of in the New Testament. Among the reasons set forth to argue that the two cannot be the same, none carry any weight.
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