On behalf of my whole family, we are so blessed to announce the birth of our daughter, Ruby. She is 6 pounds, healthy and beautiful. I would also like to thank those of you who, over these past two years, have blessed us and...

Joel Richardson WND

On February 11, 2011, addressing the success of Egypt’s revolution that he himself had enthusiastically supported, President Barack Obama stood in the Grand Foyer of the White House and triumphantly declared, “The people of Egypt have spoken, their voices have been heard, and Egypt will never be the same.”

Joel Richardson

The primary purpose of this article is to catalogue a partial list of historians, Bible scholars, commentators, and teachers, both Jewish and Christian, whose interpretations of “Gog of Magog” of Ezekiel 38-39 support the view that Gog is one and the same with the Antichrist / Beast of the New Testament. We will also identify the scholars who identify Gog and his hordes as coming from the region of modern day Turkey or the Turkish border in Syria, as opposed to modern day Russia. In this survey, it will become apparent that the widely popular modern view of Gog as an eschatological character distinct from the Antichrist, who comes from Russia, is largely a modern novelty, representing a significant minority position within Church history.

Joel Richardson WND

In early October, when a single mortar shell launched from Syria missed its target and reached Turkey’s borders, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan, was enraged.

In referring to the mere possibility of an attack launched from within Syria, Erdogan declared, “If there is a terror operation, if an irritant, emerges, then intervention would be our most natural right.”

A guest post from my friend Robert Sievers. Robert's blog is Unraveling Islam

The more I investigate Islam, the more spiritual reversals come leaping to the forefront. Sometimes these theological inversions are incredibly profound, and teaching me something new about Christ I had not seen before. Sometimes they teach me something about myself.

Joel Richardson

Among the many controversial and highly debated portions of Scripture, Matthew 24, most often referred to as “The Olivet Discourse,” or alternately, "The Olivet Prophecy," is certainly close to the top of the list. The debate primarily swirls around the timing of the fulfillment of the prophecy. What time period was Jesus referring to? Preterist interpreters argue that the entirety of this prophecy was fulfilled in the events that surrounded the destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish Temple in 70 A.D. Many Futurists, myself included, believe that Jesus was speaking here entirely of the last days. Many other commentators however, take a rather nebulous, confused or mixed view, seeing portions of the prophecy as speaking of the events of 70 A.D., other portions speaking of the last days, and other portions applying to all of history. C.A. Carson for instance, a brilliant scholar by any standard, outlines the passage as follows:

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